immigrantscanada.com

Independent topical source of current affairs, opinion and issues, featuring stories making news in Canada from immigrants, newcomers, minorities & ethnic communities' point of view and interests.

cash sweetener: The bidder has now returned with a cash sweetener, according to Globe and Mail. There are some theatrical scare tactics thrown in too. It took months of pondering, but last month a special committee of the U.S. tractor-maker's board finally did the right thing rejecting an all-share buyout from 88 per cent owner Fiat Industrial as too cheap. But this looks like a much fairer price to pay for squeezing out minorities. Don't stop here. X To continue reading this article, you must be a Globe Unlimited subscriber. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

culture kind: It was all for the Saskatchewan Writers' Guild event called, Little Stories on the Prairie, organized in celebration of Canadian Multicultural Day, according to CBC. It's really important to hear the voices of those that come from different places, because I think it's one of the best ways to learn about somebody else and where they're from, said event organizer Oin Nicholson. Writers and artists were gathered to perform storytelling, poetry and music. Multicultural Council begins community-bridging Canada 150 project As our Canadian culture gets more and more multicultural, I think it's important that every culture kind of gets representation, a voice. Rivera read some of her poetry about her life as a political exile of Chile. The event featured performances by writers Jennifer Graham and Martine No l-Maw, rapper Brad Bellegarde, also known as Info Red, and poet Mirtha Rivera. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

health outcomes: We know that racism whether it's overt, institutional or systemic measurably harms people's health, according to Toronto Star. Anti-Black racism in particular creates major disparities in health outcomes for Black people living in the GTHA. Ontario's community health centres, Aboriginal health access centres and partner organizations challenge racism every day by putting health equity at the centre of what we do. Brimbecom, Barry / Hitesh Bhardwaj/Youtube Sat., June 24, 2017 Re Woman's racist outburst speaks volumes, Paradkar, June 21Woman's racist outburst speaks volumes, Paradkar, June 21As primary health-care providers serving racialized communities, we are all too familiar with the racism experienced on a daily basis towards both our clients and racialized service providers. We are committed to creating spaces for safe, anti-oppressive and anti-racist health care including in the waiting room. Primary health care organizations across Ontario need access to better resources and staff training to tackle racism when and where it arises. Article Continued Below With the rise of divisive populist politics, these situations are likely to escalate. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

leitch tweeted: A battered wife and a bloodied hockey stick, according to CTV. That's the legacy of Trudeau's Syrian refugee program, she wrote. Last week, Leitch tweeted a link to a column about a Syrian refugee charged with beating his wife with a hockey stick. Scheer has avoided answering specific questions about the tweet, referring reporters last week to Leitch and questioning whether she believed what she had tweeted. The Conservative party under my leadership will continue to be an inclusive, welcoming party that welcomes not only immigrants, but also refugees, and ensures that Canada plays its role in welcoming people from difficult situations, Scheer said in an interview to air Sunday on CTV. For example, we led the fight to get the Liberals to do more to welcome the Yazidis, one of the most persecuted groups at the hands of ISIS... And everyone in my caucus will project those same views and those same values. In an interview with Evan Solomon, host of CTV's Question Period, Scheer wouldn't say whether he spoke to Leitch directly about what she had written on the social networking site. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

market: The meal was part of Breaking Bread; Breaking Barriers, a yearlong program that brings people of different backgrounds together for a meal featuring their cultural favourites bridging differences one plate at a time, according to Metro News. People cooking and eating together happens every day, but it doesn't often happen across our social boundaries, said Anuj Gupta, general manager of Reading Terminal Market, the historic and sprawling indoor market and home to the program. But when dinner was served, the guests seated and plates bearing foods of three different cultures shared, it all made sense. It's an incredibly powerful tool to cut through whatever social barriers you want to erect. Members of the African-American and Korean communities have come together to compare fried chicken recipes. Jews and Muslims have shared Jewish apple cake and baklava as part of the program. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

multicultural: Sunday, look for a 40 per cent chance of showers and a high of 19, according to CBC. The K-W Multicultural Festival is hitting a milestone this year as they celebrate 50 years. Latest conditions from CBC Weather Saturday night clouds will move in and bring a slightly increased chance of rain. It has grown so much it is not uncommon to see 40,000 to 50,000 attend the festival. Head to the clock tower in Victoria Park for a wonderful selection of music, dance, food and culture. Kitchener-Waterloo Multicultural Centre Fun events Saturday and Sunday the K-W Multicultural Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

parking spot: English translations should prioritise correct grammar and a proper register, while rare expressions and vocabulary words should be avoided, the newspaper said, adding that English should not be overused in public sectors . It also warned against direct translations, which have thrown up examples in the past such as Racist Park for the China Ethnic Culture Park in Beijing, according to CTV. Pee Park in Beijing should have read Fee and was for a pay parking spot, while others were more offensive -- the deformed toilet was for disabled people. The new standard will go into effect on December 1 and aims to wipe out Chinglish once and for all on public signs. There was also the sign at an entrance to a shopping mall in Beijing that helpfully recommended To take notice of safe the slippery are very crafty. It is not the first time authorities in China have attempted to rid the country of Chinglish. The stamp-down on Chinglish will disappoint English-speaking visitors to China who have long delighted in signs such as one at the Great Wall that reminded people to be careful Do not forget the fire is heartless. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

rescue workers: We won't give up as long as there is a slim of chance, the agency quoted an unidentified searcher as saying, according to CBC. Couple & baby pulled from rubble in Maoxian China landslide. Xinhua, the official news agency, reported that about 1,000 rescuers were using detection devices and dogs to look for signs of life in an area that once held 62 homes and a hotel. Rescue workers keep looking for 100 buried Saturday morning CBC sasapetricic Three members of one family were located five hours after the landslide. Just after we changed the diaper for the baby, we heard a big bang outside and the light went out, said Qiao. Qiao Dashuai, 26, said he and his wife awoke to cries from their one-month-old son around 5 30 a.m. local time. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

science professor: Our Indigenous peoples are not immigrants... managing to offend again with a paternalistic possessive, according to Rabble. He didn't actually use the weasel word, misspoke; press accounts did.I think this goes well beyond a slip; it's a conceit with a useful history in disparaging Indigenous claims. Two days later he tweeted an apology for a miscommunication. Alberta political science professor and Stephen Harper adviser Tom Flanagan, in a deliberately provocative polemic against those claims, First Nations, Second Thoughts, 2000 wrote Canadian Indians now call themselves the 'First Nations' to embody their claim to an Aboriginal right of self-government. This evoked a flood of outrage, as Flanagan surely intended. Yet they were also the first immigrants because their ancestors, like the ancestors of everyone else in North America, moved here from the Old World. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

trump administration: The Justice Department argued in court documents recently that providing the money to the Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center would violate an agreement reached in 1975 to settle a class-action lawsuit, according to Metro News. For the study, hundreds of black men suffering from the sexually transmitted disease were allowed to go untreated for decades so doctors could analyze the progression of the illness. The Trump administration opposes a bid to use unclaimed money from a legal settlement over the government's infamous Tuskegee syphilis study to fund a museum honouring victims of the research project. The government said that it does not intend in any way to justify, condone, or defend the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, but allowing remaining money from a 9 million settlement to be used for the museum would violate the settlement's original provision that any left over money go back to the government. Starting in 1932 and continuing for four decades, government medical workers operating in rural, segregated Alabama withheld treatment from unsuspecting black men infected with syphilis so doctors could track the disease and dissect their bodies afterward. Fred Gray, a civil rights attorney who represented men in the study and made the funding request in 2016, declined comment on the government's position.U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson held a telephone conference on the request on May 30, records show, but hasn't ruled yet. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

wenchuan earthquake: Officials said 1.6 kilometres of road were buried in the disaster, according to Toronto Star. It's the biggest landslide to hit this area since the Wenchuan earthquake, Wang Yongbo, an official leading one of the rescue efforts, told state broadcaster China Central Television. The landslide, which came from a mountain, engulfed a cluster of 62 homes and a hotel in the village of Xinmo in Mao County at about 6 a.m., the Sichuan provincial government said. Wang was referring to China's deadliest earthquake this century, a magnitude 7.9 temblor that struck Sichuan province in May 2008, killing nearly 90,000 people. CCTV cited a rescuer as saying five bodies had been found. The provincial government said more than 120 people were buried by the landslide. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

workers: But the debate highlighted candidates' different approaches to ensuring economic prosperity and protecting the environment, according to Rabble. Singh's economic policies questioned Member of provincial parliament for the Ontario riding of Bramalea-Gore-Malton Jagmeet Singh faced questions about his proposed changes to Old Age Security OAS and the current tax system. Candidates unanimously supported protecting workers' pensions when companies declare bankruptcy, helping temporary foreign workers gain Canadian citizenship faster, making it easier for workers to democratically join unions, and protecting workers who rely on precarious and contract employment. Singh proposes to create a Canadian Seniors Guarantee that would combine OAS, Guaranteed Income Supplement GIS the Age Credit and Pension Income Credit. Seniors with low incomes may qualify for the GIS. Guy Caron, member of Parliament for the Quebec riding of Basques, asked Singh if his proposed guarantee would be universal, like OAS is. All Canadians older than 65 who meet proper residency requirements can receive OAS. Work history does not affect eligibility. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

alexander: FAMILY PHOTO By Jim Bronskill The Canadian Press Fri., June 23, 2017 OTTAWA The Toronto-born son of Russian spies has won a court battle to regain his Canadian citizenship after it was revoked by Ottawa, according to Toronto Star. The long-awaited Federal Court of Appeal decision in Alexander Vavilov's favour is the latest twist in an intriguing espionage saga that spans continents and cultures. The federal court of appeal ruled in Alexander's favour and has given him back his Canadian citizenship that had been revoked by Ottawa. Vavilov was born in 1994 as Alexander Philip Anthony Foley to Donald Heathfield and Tracey Ann Foley. Alexander's life unravelled one day in June 2010 when the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation turned up at the family's Boston-area home. The following year the family including an older boy, Timothy left Canada for France, where they spent four years before moving to the United States. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

ctv vancouver: The largest parties are planned for Surrey and downtown Vancouver, but we've compiled a list options across the region, according to CTV. Scroll down or or click here to view the events on an interactive map. Whether you're looking for an all-day bash or an evening fireworks show, CTV Vancouver has rounded up a list of events happening July 1 from Whistler to Manning Park. VANCOUVER Fireworks set off in Coal Harbour, and across the inlet at Dundarave, will be visible from much of the downtown core's waterfront starting at 10 30 p.m. on Saturday. Fireworks are not visible from English Bay, Kitsilano or Spanish Banks. Best viewing locations include Canada Place, Harbour Green Park, Coal Harbour, Stanley Park by the 9 o'clock gun and Crab Park. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

darren osborne: Prosecutors allege he carried out a premeditated attack motivated by a hatred of Muslims and extreme political views and that he acted deliberately to maim, injure and terrify, according to CTV. Makram Ali, a 51-year-old Bangladeshi immigrant, died in the attack. Darren Osborne spoke only to confirm his name and will appear at the Central Criminal Court next week. The father of six appeared to suffer a medical problem moments before the collision, but an initial post-mortem examination found he died from multiple injuries. The attack on Monday has raised tensions in London, which had suffered three previous extremist attacks in the last few months as well as fire that killed at least 79 people, many of them immigrants. A crowd gathered after the attack, and witnesses said the suspect was detained by Mohammed Mahmoud, a local imam who helped shield Osborne from attack until police arrived. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

david johnston: Fred Chartrand / THE CANADIAN PRESS By Rick Salutin Columnist Fri., June 23, 2017 More than misspoke Gov, according to Toronto Star. Gen. Johnston's comments about Indigenous people being immigrants, goes well beyond a slip; it's a conceit with a useful history in disparaging Indigenous claims, writes Rick Salutin. David Johnston evoked winces the journalistic word of choice- when he said on-air We're a country based on immigration, going right back to our, Indigenous people, who were immigrants as well, 10, 12, 14,000 years ago. Our Indigenous peoples are not immigrants managing to offend again with a paternalistic possessive. Two days later he tweeted an apology for a miscommunication. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

espionage saga: Vavilov was born in 1994 as Alexander Philip Anthony Foley to Donald Heathfield and Tracey Ann Foley, according to CTV. The following year the family - including an older boy, Timothy - left Canada for France, where they spent four years before moving to the United States. The long-awaited Federal Court of Appeal decision in Alexander Vavilov's favour is the latest twist in an intriguing espionage saga that spans continents and cultures. Alexander's life unravelled one day in June 2010 when the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation turned up at the family's Boston-area home. My parents were handcuffed in front of my eyes and I was led to a dark car outside without being told why my parents were being arrested. I remember vividly the FBI agents entering our house with weapons as I walked down the stairs, he said in an affidavit filed with the court. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

espionage saga: Vavilov was born in 1994 as Alexander Philip Anthony Foley to Donald Heathfield and Tracey Ann Foley, according to CBC. The following year, the family including an older boy, Timothy left Canada for France, where they spent four years before moving to the United States. The long-awaited Federal Court of Appeal decision in Alexander Vavilov's favour is the latest twist in an intriguing espionage saga that spans continents and cultures. He's very happy obviously. I think if I remember correctly his words were, 'I can't wait to get to home soil,' Hadayt Nazami, lawyer for Alex and Timothy Vavilov, told CBC News. Both of them are very happy. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

filippo grandi: Malnutrition rates among refugees are alarming, according to Metro News. The World Food Program told us yesterday that the food pipeline here in Uganda will dry up soon. Disturbing shortfalls are emerging in critical areas such as food, shelter and education, Filippo Grandi told a global summit seeking 8 billion for the crisis over the next four years. Friday's summit brought pledges of 358 million, far short of the goal. Most have arrived in the past year. The East African nation now hosts 950,000 people from South Sudan. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

gender identity: Canada enacts protections for transgender community Transgender Canadians should 'feel free and safe' under new bill Many of us, regardless if we were born here or came here later in life, feel a sense of citizenship and engagement in the world around us that we simply didn't have before, she added, according to CBC. The Trans March kicks off a weekend of parades that have deeply political roots. Bill C-16 ... finally gives equal rights to people on the basis of their gender identity, trans writer and performer Nicki Ward told CBC News. Michael Cole/CBC I'm still trying to figure out what that means, to be actually a full citizen of this amazing country. It will be a hate crime target someone for being transgender. The bill updates the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Criminal Code to include the terms gender identity and gender expression. '969590339795', 'playlist Selector' 'container Selector' ' container24945328', 'ciid' 'caffeine14165519' ; New protections for trans Canadians6 13 The legislation also makes it illegal to discriminate on the basis of gender identity or expression and extends hate speech laws to include the two terms. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

gibran bassil: Some 1.5 million Syrian refugees who fled their country's conflict are believed to be living in Lebanon, equal to about a third of the Mediterranean country's population of 4.5 million people, according to Metro News. Bassil described the presence of refugees as an existential threat to Lebanon calling for a swift return of refugees to their country. Foreign Minister Wang Yi made his comments in Beirut during a news conference with his Lebanese counterpart, Gibran Bassil. Wang said that China has given Beirut aid in the past and we will continue to give such assistance to Lebanon in accordance with Lebanon's needs. As the situation improves in Syria it is natural that the refugees begin to return to their country. There should be a roadmap for a solution in Syria and for that all parties should put the interest of the Syrian state and people first, Wang said. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

lawyer: The justices sided with South Korean native Jae Lee, who has lived most of his life in the United States, according to Metro News. Lee pleaded guilty to drug charges in 2009 after his lawyer mistakenly assured him he would not be deported. But what if the lawyer is wrong, and deportation is certain The Supreme Court ruled 6-2 Friday that immigrants in those circumstances can have a second chance in court and risk going to trial, even if the prosecution's case is very strong. In fact, Lee, who had been living in the Memphis, Tennessee, area, pleaded guilty to the kind of serious crime that makes deportation near-automatic for noncitizens. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court that Lee can withdraw the guilty plea on drug charges that his lawyer advised him to enter. He was sentenced to a year in prison, but has been behind bars for 7 1/2 years while fighting to withdraw his plea and take his chances at trial, John Bursch, Lee's Supreme Court lawyer, said. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

news story: Does the same moral logic apply to countries Purported Russian meddling in U.S., French and other elections has received significant attention recently, according to Rabble. Russian meddling abroad underscores need for electoral reform in Canada declared a rabble.ca headline this week while CBC noted Russian attempts to infiltrate U.S. election systems found in 21 states officials. Either you change tact or you got what you deserved. An earlier Globe and Mail headline stated Russia was warned against U.S. election meddling ex-CIA head, while a Global News story noted Canada should worry about Russian interference in elections former CSIS head. But, how can one take the outrage seriously when the media commentators who complain about Russia ignore clear-cut Canadian meddling elsewhere and the decades-long history of U.S. interference in other countries' elections around the world, including in Canada. Interference in another country's election is an act of aggression and should not happen in a just world so these accusations deserve to be aired and investigated. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

road-rage incident: Hassanen was targeted because of her religion she was wearing a hijab and an abaya, according to Globe and Mail. The crime came less than a day before a man drove his van into a group of congregants outside a London mosque, and mere weeks after a white supremacist in Portland was accused of stabbing to death two men who intervened as he harassed a woman in a hijab on a train. And it raised tension over how to characterize it Police insist the murder was a road-rage incident, while many in the community say Ms. It's a hate crime, Abas Sherif, 39, a relative of Ms. This bunch of Muslim girls, wearing traditional Muslim clothes, are not the only people on the street. Hassanen's by marriage, said on Wednesday morning as he sat outside her home, a brick walk-up apartment building. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

supreme court: Justice Neil Gorsuch, Trump's nominee who was confirmed in April, is taking part in the highest-profile issue yet in his three months on the court, according to Globe and Mail. The case is at the Supreme Court because two federal appellate courts have ruled against the Trump travel policy, which would impose a 90-day pause in travel from citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It takes five votes to reinstate the ban, but only four to set the case for argument. The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, said the ban was rooted in religious animus toward Muslims and pointed to Trump's campaign promise to impose a ban on Muslims entering the country as well as tweets and remarks he has made since becoming president. That court also put a hold on separate aspects of the policy that would keep all refugees out of the United States for 120 days and cut by more than half, from 110,000 to 50,000, the cap on refugees in the current government spending year that ends Sept. 30. The San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the travel policy does not comply with federal immigration law, including a prohibition on nationality-based discrimination. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

toronto star: She's a senior manager with Evergreen, a non-profit environmental sustainability agency, and she describes herself as a good saver, according to Toronto Star. But she can't imagine ferreting away the cash to buy a home at least not in the foreseeable future. German shares a house downtown with three roommates. She told the Toronto Region Board of Trade on Tuesday that it's time for her cohort to speak out, to turn frustration and anger into action. But that is changing, say planners and social policy experts. In terms of . . . advocacy, we're not pulling our weight, she later said to the Toronto Star. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.