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Independent topical weblog of current affairs, opinion and issues, featuring stories making news in Canada from immigrants, newcomers & ethnic communities' point of view and interests. ?

Balanced Budget and Harper Government Surplus

question marks: So, then when oil prices started to plummet, then a few big question marks started to cloud the otherwise rosy picture." Only about six months ago, the Harper government surplus kitty for budget day goodies in the 2015-16 fiscal plan was said to have swelled to $6.5 billion, Kelly said, according to Hamilton Spectator. Cabinet ministers who had waited years for a balanced budget were salivating at the thought of being able to spend money for once. But following a long winter, the head of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business is approaching Tuesday election-year budget with his hopes somewhat in check. "Things were trucking on really well, we were certainly thinking very positively about some of our requests — some of our tax-reduction requests in particular," Kelly said. "But then, of course, that was before Christmas. By October, however, everything started to change. Then, the weeks that followed brought the deep, unexpected plunge in world oil prices, a crash Ottawa has predicted will indirectly chew billions of dollars from its bottom line. First, the Conservatives unveiled their long-promised family tax-and-benefit package, a grab bag of measures expected to carve $4.6 billion in revenue out of public coffers. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Dan Kelly and Darren Calabrese

the Canadian Federation Independent Business: But following a long winter, the head of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business is approaching Tuesday election-year budget with his hopes somewhat in check. "Things were trucking on really well, we were certainly thinking very positively about some of our requests — some of our tax-reduction requests in particular," Kelly said in an interview. "But then, of course, that was before Christmas, according to Winnipeg Free Press. So, then when oil prices started to plummet, then a few big question marks started to cloud the otherwise rosy picture." Only about six months ago, the Harper government surplus kitty for budget day goodies in the 2015-16 fiscal plan was said to have swelled to $6.5 billion, Kelly said. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese OTTAWA - As last autumn colours were setting in, veteran Ottawa lobbyist Dan Kelly was confident the spring would produce a federal budget surplus with ample room for announcements. Cabinet ministers who had waited years for a balanced budget were salivating at the thought of being able to spend money for once. First, the Conservatives unveiled their long-promised family tax-and-benefit package, a grab bag of measures expected to carve $4.6 billion in revenue out of public coffers. By October, however, everything started to change. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Nazi Germany and Soviet Union

Zeltserman voices: Born Jewish in the Soviet Union, a nation that crushed Nazi Germany but also persecuted Jews, Zeltserman voices complex feelings toward the U.S.S.R. Her lyrics speak to the joys of liberation by emigration but also sorrowful remembrance of things past, according to The Chronicle Herald. Her elegiac elements gain pathos by being plain: I was born after Stalin death. / I grew up during Brezhnev vegetarian times. / I was so lucky. So check out Ella Zeltserman debut book, Small Things Left Behind . These are autobiographical poems about tyranny, escape, immigration and nostalgia. Thus, I missed being shot / in blood-stained prison basements, / having my remains dumped / into an unmarked grave. Zeltserman catalogues what could be carried into Freedom: soap, precious lengths of home-cut silk, a hundred useless rubles, then notes the wondrous discovery of watermelon — The pink sugary heaven, sparkling like stars — in Italy and also of emerald green grass in the middle of a scorching Roman August. A last photo session with parents ends, All of a sudden … my mother gets pale / — You are never coming home again — / She drops into a chair like a wounded bird. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Federal Budget Surplus and Dan Kelly

Dan Kelly: But following a long winter, the head of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business is approaching Tuesday election-year budget with his hopes somewhat in check, according to Metro News. But then, of course, that was before Christmas. So, then when oil prices started to plummet, then a few big question marks started to cloud the otherwise rosy picture and As last autumn colours were setting in, veteran Ottawa lobbyist Dan Kelly was confident the spring would produce a federal budget surplus with ample room for announcements. Things were trucking on really well, we were certainly thinking very positively about some of our requests some of our tax-reduction requests in particular, Kelly said in an interview. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Christine Kertsanis and Second World War

: When he was just 26, Grachos went to Italy to fight Mussolini, according to Hamilton Spectator. After the Second World War ended, he was forced to take up arms again, between 1946 and 1948, when Greece became embroiled in a Civil War. But the Toronto centenarian says it his past life as a soldier, not old age, that brings pain. "I feel the pain of the war on my body," he said, as translated by his granddaughter Christine Kertsanis. The things he saw — German soldiers carting Greek Jews from their homes, soldiers starving and freezing in the mountains — haunt him still. "We're way better today, it used to be war and famine," he said. "For the 60 years I've been here, I've never felt fear." Grachos moved to Canada in 1951, and he has completely embraced this country as his own. That up from 76 just 30 years ago, and many financial planners are advising clients to plan to live well into their 80s. Although he admits he lived a pretty healthy lifestyle, he attributes much of his longevity to a peaceful life in his adopted home. "It because of Canada," he said. "Canadians can live to be millions of years old!" But what does it take to make it to triple digits In actuality, the average Canadian will live to be about 82-years-old, according to the World Health Organization. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Kingston Immigration Holding Centre and Security Certificate

national security: One, in 2005, lasted 76 days, according to Rabble. He lost 110 pounds and had to be hospitalized. In the years that followed, he undertook numerous hunger strikes. Another the next year lasted 93 days. His ordeal was the result of being subject to a security certificate, which allows the government to detain and deport those with or without legal status, using secret evidence, and without having to issue a warrant, so long as they are deemed a threat to national security. He was transferred to the Kingston Immigration Holding Centre, known as "Guantanamo North"; released from detention and put under house arrest; sent back to detention, at his request, because of the effect surveillance had on his family during his house arrest; and then returned again to house arrest, this time living alone. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Passenger Side Window

passenger side window: Behind a group of protesters holding banners a police dog barked and snarled from a black sport utility vehicle with the back passenger side window rolled down, according to Vancouver Observer. The protestors had arrived earlier in the evening and stayed until late in the evening. Police with dogs and backpacks full of pepper spray formed walls around the entrances of the Pinnacle Harbourfront Hotel to keep anti-Harper protesters at bay. Meanwhile, notable business leaders and MPs from B.C. walked into the hotel to listen to the prime ministers speak about India and Canada trade relations. At the head table, Industry Minister James Moore and Defence Minister Jason Kenney clapped as Harper announced that Canada and India had signed a $350 million dollar deal to send 3,220 metric tonnes of Saskatchewan uranium to India. Protestors gathered outside Pinnacle Hotel photo credit: Jeremy McKay Harper toasts Canada and India economic partnership During his welcome speech, Harper said it was the first time in 42 years an Indian Prime Minister had visited Canada on a "standalone bi-lateral visit."He went on to talk about the federal government commitment to a stable economy and the fight against terror both at home and abroad. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Christine Kertsanis and Second World War

soldier: I feel the pain of the war on my body, he said, as translated by his granddaughter Christine Kertsanis, according to Toronto Star. When he was just 26, Grachos went to Italy to fight Mussolini. But the Toronto centenarian says it his past life as a soldier, not old age, that brings pain. After the Second World War ended, he was forced to take up arms again, between 1946 and 1948, when Greece became embroiled in a Civil War. We’re way better today, it used to be war and famine, he said. The things he saw — German soldiers carting Greek Jews from their homes, soldiers starving and freezing in the mountains — haunt him still. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Immigration Officials and Canada

protected person: Although Mata and his family were granted asylum in Canada in 2003 owing to the danger they faced for his human rights activism in Colombia, he has remained merely a protected person in Canada because immigration officials still haven’t rendered a decision on his permanent residence application, according to Toronto Star. Canadian authorities would not reveal what caused the 12-year delay, but the family lawyer and supporters believe it a result of him being mislabeled as a guerrilla sympathizer and collaborator in propaganda by previous Colombian authorities. Ironically, the Toronto immigrant settlement counsellor himself is not a permanent resident, let alone a Canadian citizen. On Friday, Mata supporters will launch a campaign at the Toronto United Mennonite Church to raise public awareness over the man predicament and urge Immigration Minister Chris Alexander to grant him permanent status. However, our officials can’t just go on a fishing mission. No one disagrees that we need the security checks against people who apply for permanent residency, said Gloria Nafziger of Amnesty International, one of many international and local advocacy groups vouching for Mata. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Ted Rogers School Management Toronto Ryerson University and Global Diversity Exchange

Maytree Foundation: The GDX, as she calls it, will do research and exchange information about diversity and the inclusion of immigrants and visible minorities – not just in Canada but all over the world, according to Globe and Mail. It is essentially a think-and-do tank, Ms. After years of running the poverty-fighting Maytree Foundation, last fall she was named head of the new Global Diversity Exchange housed at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto Ryerson University. Omidvar, 65, tells me over lunch at one of Toronto best Chinese restaurants – Lai Wah Heen. While national governments function as the gatekeepers for immigration – letting people in or keeping them out – it is local efforts, usually at the city level, that make the difference in getting immigrants to prosper, she said. As we tuck into the dim sum, she talks about how the GDX will tap into the great minds who have studied immigration and settlement, while sharing concrete strategies and experiences that have worked effectively. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Conference Board of Canada and Richard Alexander

Richard Alexander: Richard Alexander, according to The Telegram. He also wants to see less money spent on low-priority labour market initiatives and put that money into encouraging immigration and Armed with a 120-page report written by the Conference Board of Canada, Richard Alexander had some broad suggestions Thursday morning for how the provincial government should operate. Telegram file photo Alexander, executive director of the NL Employer Council said he d like to see the government reduce spending on programs and cut the size of the public service (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Ayesha Bharmal and Vietnam War

Vietnam War: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette TORONTO - The decades-old scars on her body raise questions, but Ayesha Bharmal isn't sure she wants the answers, according to Brandon Sun. All she knows is that she suffered them as a baby in Vietnam when she was abandoned at an orphanage amid a chaotic war in the 1970s. Bharmal was among some 3,000 children scooped up by various rescue flights during the final days of the Vietnam War, 40 years ago this month. Related Items Articles Forty years on, Vietnam war orphans express thanks for Canadian adoptions Quotes from some Vietnam draft dodgers who moved to Canada40 years since end of Vietnam War, U.S. draft dodgers left their mark in Canada End Related Items She suspects they are signs of early abuse, noting that those who've seen them suggest they were caused by a knife. In the weeks preceding the fall of Saigon, conditions deteriorated rapidly as Communist forces from North Vietnam closed in on South Vietnam capital, now Ho Chi Minh City. But Bharmal doesn't linger on dark thoughts, saying she prefers to focus on the rescue mission that brought her and dozens of other children to Canada for adoption. "I know there are horror stories about how the children were destroyed ... horrifying," says Bharmal, who guesses from her features that she was the child of a black U.S. soldier. "I'm very grateful." Bharmal was among some 3,000 children scooped up by various rescue flights during the final days of the Vietnam War, 40 years ago this month. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Bill King and Draft Dodgers

Chris Young: King father, a Second World War veteran who landed at Normandy, helped negotiate a deal with the agents, who had been travelling around the United States looking for Vietnam War draft dodgers. "If I agreed to go in the military, agreed to drop the charges of draft evasion," King, 68, said in an interview from Toronto ahead of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war on April 30, according to Winnipeg Free Press. King spent the next 10 months at two army bases before fleeing the night before he was to be sent off to Vietnam. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young Related Items Articles Forty years on, Vietnam war orphans express thanks for Canadian adoptions MONTREAL - When 22-year-old Bill King returned home to Indiana in 1968 to visit his parents after a stint as Janis Joplin music director, the FBI was there waiting for him. He then hitchhiked to Canada, joining thousands of other draft dodgers between 1965 and 1975 who made the journey north of the border. Most stayed after the war, "making up the largest, best-educated group this country ever received," says an archived report on the Citizenship and Immigration website. While it is still unclear how many men and women sought sanctuary in Canada — the country labelled draft dodgers as immigrants, as opposed to refugees — the federal government estimates up to 40,000 made the journey. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Dean Ryerson Chang School Continuing Education and Technical Skills

: I know that sounds obvious, but in some cultures a schedule is a suggestion, she says, according to Globe and Mail. Newcomers to Canada often have the technical skills required to do their jobs, but can face challenges integrating into the work force because of cultural differences in workplace interactions. And as the Dean of Ryerson Chang School of Continuing Education, if she schedules a meeting for 9 a.m. she expects that everyone be there on the dot. This is a catch-all ASF view; only displays when an unsupported article type is put in an ASF drop zone Euro zone Video: Germany says 'don't bank on' Greek bailout deal The Chinese economy slowed to only 7 percent growth in the first quarter, highlighting worries about unemployment dragging it down further. Reuterseconomics Video: Chinese economy shifts into lower gear This year The International Motor Show is getting underway in Geneva. Meg Teckman reports. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Draft Dodgers and Vietnam

Vietnam: King spent the next 10 months at two army bases before fleeing the night before he was to be sent off to Vietnam, according to CTV. He then hitchhiked to Canada, joining thousands of other draft dodgers between 1965 and 1975 who made the journey north of the border. King father, a Second World War veteran who landed at Normandy, helped negotiate a deal with the agents, who had been travelling around the United States looking for Vietnam War draft dodgers. "If I agreed to go in the military, agreed to drop the charges of draft evasion," King, 68, said in an interview from Toronto ahead of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war on April 30. While it is still unclear how many men and women sought sanctuary in Canada -- the country labelled draft dodgers as immigrants, as opposed to refugees -- the federal government estimates up to 40,000 made the journey. King, an award-winning musician, producer and broadcaster, said the stories he heard from returning soldiers convinced him that he had to leave. Most stayed after the war, "making up the largest, best-educated group this country ever received," says an archived report on the Citizenship and Immigration website. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Frank Anna Friesen

: Some stand out as heroes among us, according to Winnipeg Free Press. The quiet lives they live today give no insight into the courage within their hearts, nor does it reflect the bravery it took in their journey to Canada. Paul. It these extraordinary people who will be forever printed on my mind. The story of how they came to Canada reflects the hardships many immigrants endured before they found refuge in our great country. Frank and Anna Friesen are such people. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Human Rights Organization and Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh

Mahatma Gandhi: But his past comes back to haunt him, according to Rabble. A human rights organization called Sikhs for Justice has appealed to the Canadian government to prosecute Modi for his alleged role in the massacre of Muslims in Gujarat, a western state of India. Modi, an extremist Hindu nationalist, has support within a section of Canadian Indians. Until a year ago, Modi was denied a visa to visit the U.S. because of severe violations of religious freedom. Modi rose from the ranks of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh , an extremist nationalist organization that was briefly banned in India after one of its members, Nathuram Godse, assassinated Mahatma Gandhi. While Modi was chief minister of Gujarat, he was accused of criminal conspiracy in a pogrom against Muslims in 2002 in which more than 1,000 were killed, and over 100,000 were made refugees. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King and Japanese Canadians

Department National Defence: In both countries, the decision was made to round up all residents of Japanese descent on the west coast and forcibly relocate the entire populations to internment camps located away from the coast, according to Rabble. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King decision to intern more than 20,000 Japanese Canadians was not without controversy, but wartime hysteria was high and there was much popular support. The fear in North America was that, should Japan attack, the invaders might be assisted by acts of treason and espionage coming from within the Japanese Canadian or American communities. It is important to note that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Department of National Defence advised that the interment was unwarranted, but racism and economics took precedence. All fishing boats belonging to Japanese Canadians were seized. Internment Japanese Canadians were competitive in the fishing industry and this was an opportunity for non-Japanese to steal their business and profit. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Pedro Antunes and Conference Board Canada

Conference Board Canada,: The Conference Board of Canada Deputy Chief Economist, Pedro Antunes, says the province faces challenges around an aging population and a declining workforce, according to CBC. Antunes said this province did "phenomenally well" in the decade from 2003-13, with wages alone going up by 43 percent - compared to two-and-a-half percent in Ontario. The report, authored by The Conference Board of Canada, says the province needs to be more competitive and it includes several key recommendations in areas such as innovation, education, immigration, investment and government policy. "Oil brought an economic boom to Newfoundland and Labrador, but that boom is ending, which means the province will not be able to rely as heavily on this industry to drive economic growth or fund government program spending," said Pedro Antunes, Deputy Chief Economist of The Conference Board of Canada. "Focusing on improving the province competitive business environment will help mitigate some of the negative effects." The report, Achieving Sustainable Prosperity: Benchmarking the Competitiveness of Newfoundland and Labrador, compares the province competitive performance to its closest competitors in such areas as innovation, labour market, and the business environment. But he was quick to add that the wealth generated by offshore oil is masking several fundamental problems. Not only are you seeing a decline in GDP, but that means very weak government revenues and an aging population that requires health care and other services," Antunes said. The province has the oldest population in Canada and is not attracting enough immigrants to replace retiring workers, so Antunes predicts a decline in our labour force. "That going to be the number one challenge I think for the province. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Pedro Antunes and Conference Board Canada,

Conference Board Canada,: The Conference Board of Canada Deputy Chief Economist, Pedro Antunes, says the province faces challenges around an aging population and a declining workforce, according to CBC. Antunes said this province did "phenomenally well" in the decade from 2003-13, with wages alone going up by 43 percent - compared to two-and-a-half percent in Ontario. The report, authored by The Conference Board of Canada, says the province needs to be more competitive and it includes several key recommendations in areas such as innovation, education, immigration, investment and government policy. "Oil brought an economic boom to Newfoundland and Labrador, but that boom is ending, which means the province will not be able to rely as heavily on this industry to drive economic growth or fund government program spending," said Pedro Antunes, Deputy Chief Economist of The Conference Board of Canada. "Focusing on improving the province competitive business environment will help mitigate some of the negative effects." The report, Achieving Sustainable Prosperity: Benchmarking the Competitiveness of Newfoundland and Labrador, compares the province competitive performance to its closest competitors in such areas as innovation, labour market, and the business environment. But he was quick to add that the wealth generated by offshore oil is masking several fundamental problems. Not only are you seeing a decline in GDP, but that means very weak government revenues and an aging population that requires health care and other services," Antunes said. The province has the oldest population in Canada and is not attracting enough immigrants to replace retiring workers, so Antunes predicts a decline in our labour force. "That going to be the number one challenge I think for the province. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Vietnam

Vietnam: King spent the next 10 months at two army bases before fleeing the night before he was to be sent off to Vietnam, according to CTV. He then hitchhiked to Canada, joining thousands of other draft dodgers between 1965 and 1975 who made the journey north of the border. King father, a Second World War veteran who landed at Normandy, helped negotiate a deal with the agents, who had been travelling around the United States looking for Vietnam War draft dodgers. "If I agreed to go in the military, agreed to drop the charges of draft evasion," King, 68, said in an interview from Toronto ahead of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war on April 30. While it is still unclear how many men and women sought sanctuary in Canada -- the country labelled draft dodgers as immigrants, as opposed to refugees -- the federal government estimates up to 40,000 made the journey. King, an award-winning musician, producer and broadcaster, said the stories he heard from returning soldiers convinced him that he had to leave. Most stayed after the war, "making up the largest, best-educated group this country ever received," says an archived report on the Citizenship and Immigration website. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Vietnam War Draft Dodgers

Vietnam: King spent the next 10 months at two army bases before fleeing the night before he was to be sent off to Vietnam, according to CTV. He then hitchhiked to Canada, joining thousands of other draft dodgers between 1965 and 1975 who made the journey north of the border. King father, a Second World War veteran who landed at Normandy, helped negotiate a deal with the agents, who had been travelling around the United States looking for Vietnam War draft dodgers. "If I agreed to go in the military, agreed to drop the charges of draft evasion," King, 68, said in an interview from Toronto ahead of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war on April 30. While it is still unclear how many men and women sought sanctuary in Canada -- the country labelled draft dodgers as immigrants, as opposed to refugees -- the federal government estimates up to 40,000 made the journey. King, an award-winning musician, producer and broadcaster, said the stories he heard from returning soldiers convinced him that he had to leave. Most stayed after the war, "making up the largest, best-educated group this country ever received," says an archived report on the Citizenship and Immigration website. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Chaldean Catholics and Father Sarmad Biloues

Syria: Several thousand Chaldean Catholics from Iraq have arrived in the Vancouver area in the past few years, according to Vancouver Courier. Their path here has been chaotic, buffeted by the tragedies of life first in their country of origin, then in Syria, where they originally took refuge. Events in the Middle East are driving a unique group of newcomers to our shores, fleeing years of repression, violence and fear. Father Sarmad Biloues is the spiritual leader of Chaldean Catholics in B.C., about 85 per cent of whom have arrived in the last decade. Like the refugees themselves, the priest fled Iraq, then pastored to those in refugee camps in Syria. A few arrived earlier, resettled by the UN in the 1990s, after the first Gulf War. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Father Sarmad Biloues and Syria

Syria: Several thousand Chaldean Catholics from Iraq have arrived in the Vancouver area in the past few years, according to Vancouver Courier. Their path here has been chaotic, buffeted by the tragedies of life first in their country of origin, then in Syria, where they originally took refuge. Events in the Middle East are driving a unique group of newcomers to our shores, fleeing years of repression, violence and fear. Father Sarmad Biloues is the spiritual leader of Chaldean Catholics in B.C., about 85 per cent of whom have arrived in the last decade. Like the refugees themselves, the priest fled Iraq, then pastored to those in refugee camps in Syria. A few arrived earlier, resettled by the UN in the 1990s, after the first Gulf War. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

International Development Minister Christian Paradis and Crisis Situations

crisis situations: International Development Minister Christian Paradis said the bulk of the money will go to a four-year extension of Canada involvement in the Global Partnership for Education, which includes governments and NGOs. "We wanted to send the signal that we can't forget these kids in crisis situations and need to support them," Paradis said in an interview at the World Bank on Thursday. "It not right to have children lose their childhood because adults are fighting." From that announced sum, $10 million is a one-year contribution to UNICEF for education in crisis-affected areas, notably Syria, as well as the Central African Republic and Sudan, according to The Waterloo Record. The Syrian conflict has left a devastating toll on children: in neighbouring Lebanon alone, an estimated 400,000 young refugees remain out of school and one-quarter of that country children are now refugees. The contribution stems from different announcements made during the annual spring financial meetings in Washington. UNICEF executive director said that while there are 107,000 more children in school than last year, that hasn't nearly met the need. "We are not close, in truth," Anthony Lake said. "But we are a lot closer than a year ago." Paradis made the funding pledge at an event with former British prime minister Gordon Brown, the UN Special Envoy For Education. The U.K. coalition government passed a law last month enshrining its commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of GDP on development. Paradis was asked about the huge difference in international development contributions by Britain and Canada. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Vietnam War

Vietnam War: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette TORONTO - The decades-old scars on her body raise questions, but Ayesha Bharmal isn't sure she wants the answers, according to Brandon Sun. All she knows is that she suffered them as a baby in Vietnam when she was abandoned at an orphanage amid a chaotic war in the 1970s. Bharmal was among some 3,000 children scooped up by various rescue flights during the final days of the Vietnam War, 40 years ago this month. Related Items Articles Forty years on, Vietnam war orphans express thanks for Canadian adoptions Quotes from some Vietnam draft dodgers who moved to Canada40 years since end of Vietnam War, U.S. draft dodgers left their mark in Canada End Related Items She suspects they are signs of early abuse, noting that those who've seen them suggest they were caused by a knife. In the weeks preceding the fall of Saigon, conditions deteriorated rapidly as Communist forces from North Vietnam closed in on South Vietnam capital, now Ho Chi Minh City. But Bharmal doesn't linger on dark thoughts, saying she prefers to focus on the rescue mission that brought her and dozens of other children to Canada for adoption. "I know there are horror stories about how the children were destroyed ... horrifying," says Bharmal, who guesses from her features that she was the child of a black U.S. soldier. "I'm very grateful." Bharmal was among some 3,000 children scooped up by various rescue flights during the final days of the Vietnam War, 40 years ago this month. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.
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