immigrantscanada.com

Independent topical source of current affairs, opinion and issues, featuring stories making news in Canada from immigrants, newcomers, minorities & ethnic communities' point of view and interests.

Europe campaign: The Leave Europe campaign includes Britain First campaigners and has been given the nickname Brexit or Britain Exit, according to Huffington Post Canada. A big supporter of the Leave campaign is former London mayor Boris Johnson who cites a loss of control of British borders, trade and Democracy as reasons for a Leave vote. Alongside this hum of excitement exists a tension and a darkness brought on by the referendum that will decide if Britain stays in the European Union or leaves it entirely. The Remain in Europe campaign is defended by London mayor Sadiq Khan and David Bechkam who have discussed the positive contributions of immigration to Britain. Some of the darkness and tension surrounding the final referendum vote on June 23rd erupted into violence when Labour MP Jo Cox was killed by a Britain First supporter. The Remain campaign has promoted unity with Europe and the idea that Britain is stronger in the European Union than outside of it. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

security background information: Sources say Mr, according to Globe and Mail. Nieto, who arrives in Canada on Monday, has assured the Canadian government that Mexico will share security and background information on Mexicans travellers, similar to what is done between Canada and the United States. Low-risk travellers, having either a valid U.S. visa or a 10-year Canadian visa, would be eligible for an electronic travel authorization. Mexico will also issue travel warnings to its citizens, explaining that Canada is not an easy country in which to seek refugee status and they must abide by Canadian laws, sources say. The official acknowledged there was pushback from Citizen and Immigration officials, but attributed that to years of working for the Harper Conservatives, which took a hardline approach to bogus refugee claims. We are trying to make sure the onus is on them to make sure it is legitimate travel, a senior government official told The Globe and Mail. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

federal appeals court: In this case, the federal appeals court in New Orleans said the Obama administration lacked the authority to shield up to 4 million immigrants from deportation and make them eligible for work permits without approval from Congress, according to Toronto Star. Texas led 26 Republican-dominated states in challenging the program Obama announced in November 2014. The justices' one-sentence opinion on Thursday effectively kills the plan for the duration of Obama presidency.A tie vote sets no national precedent but leaves in place the ruling by the lower court. Congressional Republicans also backed the states' lawsuit. Obama decided to move forward after Republicans won control of the Senate in the 2014 midterm elections, and the chances for an immigration overhaul, already remote, were further diminished. The Obama administration announced the programs — protections for parents of children who are in the country legally and an expansion of the program that benefits people who were brought to this country as children — in November 2014. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

assisted dying: Dawn Davies, the group chair on bioethics and a pediatric palliative care physician in Edmonton, told CBC News now that there is a law in Canada for adults when it comes to assisted dying, the issue of mature minors will be the subject of an independent review, according to CBC. Pediatrician Dr. Right to die: Should 'mature minors' have access to doctor-assisted death Dr. Dawn Davies is hoping for broad consultations when it comes to mature minors and assisted dying. The new law doesn't provide for a surrogate decision maker to act on behalf of another person. "That where the challenges are going to come actually, is from parents who would be able to make virtually any other medical decision on behalf of their child, but they will not be able to make that decision," said Davies. "I think those are where the charter challenges to the court are actually going to come from, is going to be parents." Broad consultations required When it comes to mature minors, Davies hopes there will be broad consultation in the review process. "Not just from pediatric child health, but also from child protection, parents themselves, mature minors themselves," she said. "Then I think we can have a better process that would exclude mature minors from being able to, you know, apply for medically-assisted dying if they had anything other than a terminal illness." A shortage of pediatric palliative care On a related issue, Davies said there are 20 full-time pediatric palliative care physician positions in Canada, and that is not enough.. "For the number of kids that die in Canada every year, that is like a woefully inadequate number of people with specialized training in palliative care, I think, to say that we're doing a very good job of managing the symptoms of kids at the end of life," she said. That review will address the circumstances under which a person under the age of 18 might be able to request a physician-assisted death, but Davies said most requests to the palliative care community in Canada come from parents, not teenagers. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: European People Party chairman Manfred Weber says Friday that the vote "causes major damage to both sides, but in first line to the U.K." Weber added that "this was a British vote, not a European vote, according to CTV. People in the other states don't want to leave Europe." Britons voted 52 per cent to 48 per cent on Thursday to leave the EU to take greater control of the country economy and borders. 6:30 a.m. The head of the biggest political bloc in the European Parliament says the U.K. vote to leave the EU is damaging but that the decision is for Britain, not the European Union. One of the leaders of the victorious 'leave' campaign has reassured the European Union that Britain will continue to be a good neighbour after its unprecedented vote to leave the bloc. Dutch far-right leader Geert Wilders is calling for a plebiscite in the Netherlands about leaving the European Union after Britons voted to ditch the 28-nation bloc. Labour lawmaker Gisela Stuart, who was born in Germany, spoke in German to say that "Britain is an open society, it is a welcoming society and we will continue to be co-operating with European countries on an international level." As the British pound and global stock markets fell at the shocking result, Stuart says "it is incumbent on all of us to be very calm, remember that our responsibility is to the future of the United Kingdom, and work together to start a process." She says "in the long run, I think that both Europe and the United Kingdom will emerge stronger as a result." 6:25 a.m. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

prawn cocktail: There are huge issues at stake, from immigration to millions of jobs, according to Metro News. But there also small stuff that could be caught in the crosshairs if the U.K votes to leave. Millions of Brits go to the polls Thursday to decide on staying in or leaving the European Union. Andrew Cardozo, who imports British products, from mushy peas to prawn cocktail crisps, to his London Calling shop in Cabbagetown, said he following the debate closely and is concerned about what might happen if Britain bolts. I think the younger people are more going to be voting yes. I'll be upset if I can't get them, Cardozo said, standing in front of rows of imported Cadbury chocolates. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Manfred Weber: European People Party chairman Manfred Weber says Friday that the vote "causes major damage to both sides, but in first line to the U.K." Weber added that "this was a British vote, not a European vote, according to CTV. People in the other states don't want to leave Europe." Britons voted 52 per cent to 48 per cent on Thursday to leave the EU to take greater control of the country economy and borders. 6:30 a.m. The head of the biggest political bloc in the European Parliament says the U.K. vote to leave the EU is damaging but that the decision is for Britain, not the European Union. One of the leaders of the victorious 'leave' campaign has reassured the European Union that Britain will continue to be a good neighbour after its unprecedented vote to leave the bloc. Dutch far-right leader Geert Wilders is calling for a plebiscite in the Netherlands about leaving the European Union after Britons voted to ditch the 28-nation bloc. Labour lawmaker Gisela Stuart, who was born in Germany, spoke in German to say that "Britain is an open society, it is a welcoming society and we will continue to be co-operating with European countries on an international level." As the British pound and global stock markets fell at the shocking result, Stuart says "it is incumbent on all of us to be very calm, remember that our responsibility is to the future of the United Kingdom, and work together to start a process." She says "in the long run, I think that both Europe and the United Kingdom will emerge stronger as a result." 6:25 a.m. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

organs: The source of the organs, the film alleges, are prisoners of conscience, especially Falun Gong practitioners, who are executed, according to CBC. Recipients have 'lifelong burden and remorse' Lee interviewed many Falun Gong practitioners who said they were tortured while in Chinese custody and were frequently blood-tested — presumably to see if they were suitable matches for transplant. "China has been using the organs of death row prisoners for years, and some of these prisoners of conscience are treated even worse," he said. "Using organs from someone who they deem to be even worse than death row prisoners is not a big jump." He also interviewed the medical tourists who received the organs. "Many of them would just fly there and get a transplant several days later. Leon Lee came to Canada from China over 10 years ago but made waves in 2014 worldwide for his film, Human Harvest, which exposed illegal human organ trafficking in China. "It an incredible honour and a very meaningful award for me personally," Lee told On The Coast guest host Michelle Eliot. "Where I'm from, if I were to make a film, like, say, Human Harvest, I would not be expecting an award." China accused of harvesting the organs of political prisoners, researchers say it time Canada take action China transplant organs mostly from death row China harvesting Falun Gong organs, report alleges Human Harvest looks into the thousands of cases of for-profit organs transplants being done in China, often for medical tourists. They also described how shady the whole process looks … they were not allowed to ask the source of the donor," he said. "After they find out the source of the organ, it was a lifelong burden and remorse." Since Human Harvest came out, Lee says, awareness about the issue has increased markedly, which he hopes will lead to international pressure on China and eventually change. With files from CBC Radio One On The Coast To hear the full story, click the audio labelled: Filmmaker who exposed organ trafficking in China honoured as one of Canada top immigrants (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

stock markets: The result shocked investors, and stock markets plummeted around the world, with key indexes dropping 10 per cent in Germany and about 8 per cent in Japan and Britain, according to Metro News. The euro fell against the dollar and the pound dropped to its lowest level since 1985, plunging more than 10 per cent from about $1.50 to $1.35 before a slight recovery, on concerns that severing ties with the single market will hurt the U.K. economy and undermine London position as a global financial centre . Bank of England Gov. Polls ahead of the vote had shown a close race, but the momentum had increasingly appeared to be on the "remain" side over the last week. Mark Carney sought to reassure the markets."We are well prepared for this," Carney said. "The Treasury and the Bank of England have engaged in extensive contingency planning. ... We have taken all the necessary steps to prepare for today events."The U.K. would be the first major country to leave the EU, which was born from the ashes of World War II as European leaders sought to build links and avert future hostility. Germany called top diplomats from the EU six founding nations to a meeting Saturday, and the president of the European Council, Donald Tusk, said the bloc will meet without Britain at a summit next week to assess its future. With no precedent, the impact on the single market of 500 million people — the world largest economy — is unclear. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: By Nicholas Keung Immigration reporter Thu., June 23, 2016 In January, Canadian officials matched Sarah Crawford and her sponsorship group with a Syrian family in Turkey and told them the refugees could be here in as soon as four weeks, according to Toronto Star. The group spent thousands of dollars renting a bungalow near Victoria Park Ave. and Ellesmere Rd. that sat empty for four months before the family of six finally arrived on June 1 from Istanbul. Hundreds of refugee families who have been approved for resettlement to Canada have been waiting for months for flights to Canada. Despite the long wait and wasted rent money, Crawford group, Rise Again, from Rosedale United Church, is actually one of the lucky ones. According to Canada for Refugees, a coalition of community sponsorship groups, some 2,900 refugees, or about 500 families, who have been fully approved and are ready to travel are stuck in limbo, having already waited two or three months or longer to get on a plane to Canada. Hundreds of other groups are still waiting for their families to arrive. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: Bourque was adopted and grew up in an Acadian family, and re-connected with her Mi'kmaq relatives as an adult, according to CBC. Bourque work looks at urban and rural P.E.I., through her eyes. "For the first time I'm able to bring my pride of who I am. Patricia Bourque exhibit is called My Two Worlds, and it focuses on life in rural and urban P.E.I., through her eyes. "I wanted to bring First Nations working and living and playing into a more urban environment," she explained. Growing up I was the different one, and it was hard to be Mi'kmaq, that why this night is so special," she said of the exhibit opening. "These photos — I can express my pride and my love of the community and where I come from. MORE P.E.I. NEWS Prince County businesses make pitch to immigrant entrepreneursMORE P.E.I. NEWS Charlottetown company squeezes out deal to extract cannabis oil And I can share with everybody." This is Bourque first photography gallery exhibit, and it will run until July 3 at The Guild. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Conservative caucus: Obhrai, the dean of the Conservative caucus, declined to further discuss his current plans, according to Huffington Post Canada. But a caucus member approached to sign a form supporting Obhrai candidacy said his solicitation came with a commitment that when he loses he would throw his support behind another candidate: Peter Mac Kay. I don't want to run if I don't have the base to run," he told The Huffington Post Canada this week. Deepak Obhrai rises during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Wednesday September 21, 2011. He is the presumptive front-runner should he choose to join the race. Ohbrai would neither confirm nor deny the unusual pitch. "He tells me his wife has to approve," Obhrai said, said of Mac Kay possible entrance into the race. "I haven't officially filed any papers, I'm just gauging the support." Mac Kay, a former cabinet minister from Nova Scotia, who as leader of the Progressive Conservative party was responsible for uniting-the-right federally under the Conservative umbrella, left politics last year to spend time with his family. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: They were testing ads to promote the resettlement program and were told using that photo might create a problem, a perception most common in the two Montreal groups. "Some felt that by showing a single mother wearing a head scarf, this image may generate negative reactions among members of the general public who were reluctant to accept refugees by reinforcing some negative stereotypes associated with Syrian refugees," said a report on the discussions, posted online recently by the Privy Council Office, according to CTV. Those who liked the picture said it sent an important message. "The image showing a mother and a child was seen to elicit compassion and showed the love of a mother for her child," the report said. "It elicited a desire to help them make a better living in Canada." The photo of the woman in the head scarf and one featuring a group of children still appear on the Immigration Department website as the push continues to settle Syrians. The photo was one of five put before eight focus groups run last November and December by the civil servants supporting the Prime Minister Office. The effort to bring 25,000 to Canada in a matter of four months began in November and, a few days later, questions about it were added to the regular meetings the Privy Council Office holds with groups across the country to discuss current events. Those who supported the plan felt it was what Canada was about, the report said. "They viewed Canada as a country of immigrants that welcomed those in need: 'This is what we do'." Those ambivalent also felt that way, the report said, but wanted more time taken to ensure everything was done right. Those in Halifax and Vancouver, B.C. were most supportive, while participants from Toronto and Montreal were more divided. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

negative stereotypes: They were testing ads to promote the resettlement program and were told using that photo might create a problem, a perception most common in the two Montreal groups."Some felt that by showing a single mother wearing a head scarf, this image may generate negative reactions among members of the general public who were reluctant to accept refugees by reinforcing some negative stereotypes associated with Syrian refugees," said a report on the discussions, posted online recently by the Privy Council Office, according to Metro News. Those who liked the picture said it sent an important message."The image showing a mother and a child was seen to elicit compassion and showed the love of a mother for her child," the report said. "It elicited a desire to help them make a better living in Canada."The photo of the woman in the head scarf and one featuring a group of children still appear on the Immigration Department website as the push continues to settle Syrians. The photo was one of five put before eight focus groups run last November and December by the civil servants supporting the Prime Minister Office. The effort to bring 25,000 to Canada in a matter of four months began in November and, a few days later, questions about it were added to the regular meetings the Privy Council Office holds with groups across the country to discuss current events. Those who supported the plan felt it was what Canada was about, the report said."They viewed Canada as a country of immigrants that welcomed those in need: 'This is what we do'."Those ambivalent also felt that way, the report said, but wanted more time taken to ensure everything was done right. Those in Halifax and Vancouver, B.C. were most supportive, while participants from Toronto and Montreal were more divided. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: By Nicholas Keung Immigration reporter Thu., June 23, 2016 In January, Canadian officials matched Sarah Crawford and her sponsorship group with a Syrian family in Turkey and told them the refugees could be here in as soon as four weeks, according to Toronto Star. The group spent thousands of dollars renting a bungalow near Victoria Park Ave. and Ellesmere Rd. that sat empty for four months before the family of six finally arrived on June 1 from Istanbul. Hundreds of refugee families who have been approved for resettlement to Canada have been waiting for months for flights to Canada. Despite the long wait and wasted rent money, Crawford group, Rise Again, from Rosedale United Church, is actually one of the lucky ones. According to Canada for Refugees, a coalition of community sponsorship groups, some 2,900 refugees, or about 500 families, who have been fully approved and are ready to travel are stuck in limbo, having already waited two or three months or longer to get on a plane to Canada. Hundreds of other groups are still waiting for their families to arrive. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

negative stereotypes: They were testing ads to promote the resettlement program and were told using that photo might create a problem, a perception most common in the two Montreal groups."Some felt that by showing a single mother wearing a head scarf, this image may generate negative reactions among members of the general public who were reluctant to accept refugees by reinforcing some negative stereotypes associated with Syrian refugees," said a report on the discussions, posted online recently by the Privy Council Office, according to Brandon Sun. Those who liked the picture said it sent an important message."The image showing a mother and a child was seen to elicit compassion and showed the love of a mother for her child," the report said. "It elicited a desire to help them make a better living in Canada."The photo of the woman in the head scarf and one featuring a group of children still appear on the Immigration Department website as the push continues to settle Syrians. The photo was one of five put before eight focus groups run last November and December by the civil servants supporting the Prime Minister Office. The effort to bring 25,000 to Canada in a matter of four months began in November and, a few days later, questions about it were added to the regular meetings the Privy Council Office holds with groups across the country to discuss current events. Those who supported the plan felt it was what Canada was about, the report said."They viewed Canada as a country of immigrants that welcomed those in need: 'This is what we do'."Those ambivalent also felt that way, the report said, but wanted more time taken to ensure everything was done right. Those in Halifax and Vancouver, B.C. were most supportive, while participants from Toronto and Montreal were more divided. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

negative stereotypes: They were testing ads to promote the resettlement program and were told using that photo might create a problem, a perception most common in the two Montreal groups. "Some felt that by showing a single mother wearing a head scarf, this image may generate negative reactions among members of the general public who were reluctant to accept refugees by reinforcing some negative stereotypes associated with Syrian refugees," said a report on the discussions, posted online recently by the Privy Council Office, according to The Waterloo Record. Those who liked the picture said it sent an important message. "The image showing a mother and a child was seen to elicit compassion and showed the love of a mother for her child," the report said. "It elicited a desire to help them make a better living in Canada." The photo of the woman in the head scarf and one featuring a group of children still appear on the Immigration Department website as the push continues to settle Syrians. The photo was one of five put before eight focus groups run last November and December by the civil servants supporting the Prime Minister Office. The effort to bring 25,000 to Canada in a matter of four months began in November and, a few days later, questions about it were added to the regular meetings the Privy Council Office holds with groups across the country to discuss current events. Those who supported the plan felt it was what Canada was about, the report said. "They viewed Canada as a country of immigrants that welcomed those in need: 'This is what we do'." Those ambivalent also felt that way, the report said, but wanted more time taken to ensure everything was done right. Those in Halifax and Vancouver, B.C. were most supportive, while participants from Toronto and Montreal were more divided. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: They were testing ads to promote the resettlement program and were told using that photo might create a problem, a perception most common in the two Montreal groups."Some felt that by showing a single mother wearing a head scarf, this image may generate negative reactions among members of the general public who were reluctant to accept refugees by reinforcing some negative stereotypes associated with Syrian refugees," said a report on the discussions, posted online recently by the Privy Council Office, according to Brandon Sun. Those who liked the picture said it sent an important message."The image showing a mother and a child was seen to elicit compassion and showed the love of a mother for her child," the report said. "It elicited a desire to help them make a better living in Canada."The photo of the woman in the head scarf and one featuring a group of children still appear on the Immigration Department website as the push continues to settle Syrians. The photo was one of five put before eight focus groups run last November and December by the civil servants supporting the Prime Minister Office. The effort to bring 25,000 to Canada in a matter of four months began in November and, a few days later, questions about it were added to the regular meetings the Privy Council Office holds with groups across the country to discuss current events. Those who supported the plan felt it was what Canada was about, the report said."They viewed Canada as a country of immigrants that welcomed those in need: 'This is what we do'."Those ambivalent also felt that way, the report said, but wanted more time taken to ensure everything was done right. Those in Halifax and Vancouver, B.C. were most supportive, while participants from Toronto and Montreal were more divided. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Das Gupta: The University of Waterloo urban planning grad, a former international student from India who finished his degree three years ago, had to give up his Kitchener job as a technical support specialist for a digital firm, according to The Waterloo Record. His resources were dwindling even if his new tourist visa runs until January next year. His post-graduate work permit expired in April. So, after Canada Day, Das Gupta was planning to either return to his parents in India Goa region, or visit his aunt near Los Angeles. He was as good as gone. It was practically decided. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Syrian refugees: They're taking English classes, but mail remains a mystery, according to Metro News. And, as they're learning, life in Canada means paperwork. He in Ahmad and Intissar El Abed living room — Syrian refugees with six kids. On the top of the pile is the federal census. Schools are always sending things, he says, holding up the list of school supplies. The next envelope holds a bright blue sheet of paper, and El Bouhali sighs and points to a date, several days past. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

CEO Janice Price: With founding CEO Janice Price having moved to the Banff Centre last year and two artistic directors, Chris Lorway and Jorn Weisbrodt, having each completed a five-year term, Gagliano is now the last man standing, according to Toronto Star. But after shouldering responsibility for 10 editions, Gagliano is finally ready to let go and anoint a successor. By Martin Knelman Entertainment Columnist Wed., June 22, 2016 When you're engaged and when you give the most as well, that when you're alive, says Tony Gagliano, who started as co-chair and co-founder of Luminato a decade ago in partnership with David Pecaut, and wound up as solo chair and ultimate boss of the annual Toronto arts festival. The vision and the purpose of Luminato was city-building, he recalled the other day over drinks at the King Edward Hotel, sharing memories and flashing back to how he segued from running a family business to becoming a power broker in the Toronto arts world, even while remaining virtually unknown to the public. Article Continued Below As our 10th-anniversary festival winds down, my focus will shift to my next important decision regarding Luminato: working closely with the board of directors and CEO Anthony Sargent to appoint a successor to me as board chair, he said. Soon the curtain will fall on Gagliano foray into the culture world. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Laurie Davidson: Then he heard about the MOSAIC Employee Resource Group at RBC. Employee resource groups at RBC help bring together employees from a shared background and give them a resource to help them develop personally and professionally, according to Hamilton Spectator. One of six ERGs at RBC, MOSAIC aims to foster an inclusive culture by enabling the success of newcomers to Canada within RBC. "The group is open for all RBC staff and fosters success through networking, peer coaching, mentoring and educating other employees across the organization," says Laurie Davidson, regional vice-president for RBC in the greater Hamilton market. "It also works to connect colleagues to supports in the community and personal and professional development opportunities." Through MOSAIC, Trehan connected with different leaders in the financial sector from across southwestern Ontario and with peers from retail, commercial and regional RBC offices. Leaving behind his personal and professional networks, Trehan was keen for opportunities to form new connections in Hamilton. The group provided Trehan with the opportunity to learn about and better understand the different neighbourhoods in Hamilton. They share information, set up discussion boards, brainstorm strategies to counter the challenges facing newcomers, and identify ways in which they help and support newcomers. It made him feel a part of the city, one of the most diverse and multicultural cities in Canada. "The communities in Hamilton are changing fast and so are the needs of our clients," says Davidson. "MOSAIC creates awareness of what it means to be a newcomer in Canada, so that we can be truly inclusive." The 16 MOSAIC members get together monthly. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

European Union Voters: What on the ballot The referendum question will read, Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union Voters will have the option of putting an x next to one of two answers: Article Continued Below Remain a member of the European Union, according to Toronto Star. Leave the European Union. The vote – dubbed Brexit, a nifty portmanteau combining the words Britain and exit – marks a historic moment that could shape the future of the country, both politically and economically, for generations. The wording was changed from a simple yes or no question last September, after the Electoral Commission warned it could be confusing, and might be biased towards those who want to stay in the EU. Article Continued Below Who can vote British or Irish citizens who live in the U.K. Commonwealth citizens who are residents of the U.K. British citizens who live overseas but have been registered to vote in the U.K. in the last 15 years. For more info, head to the Electoral Commission website. react-text: 162 One of the referendum ballots that U.K. citizens will use to decide whether the country should remain in the European Union. /react-text So, Canadians can vote Yes, if you are a Canadian citizen who currently lives in the U.K. When will we know the result The polls close at 10 p.m. Irish citizens living overseas who were born in Northern Ireland and who have been registered to vote in Northern Ireland in the last 15 years. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Electoral Commission: What on the ballot The referendum question will read, "Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union " Voters will have the option of putting an "x" next to one of two answers: "Remain a member of the European Union." "Leave the European Union." The wording was changed from a simple "yes" or "no" last September, after the Electoral Commission warned it could be confusing, and might be biased toward those who want to stay in the E.U. Who can vote • British or Irish citizens who live in the U.K. • Commonwealth citizens who are residents of the U.K. • British citizens who live overseas but have been registered to vote in the U.K. in the last 15 years. • Irish citizens living overseas who were born in Northern Ireland and who have been registered to vote in Northern Ireland in the last 15 years, according to Hamilton Spectator. For more info, head to the Electoral Commission website. The vote — dubbed "Brexit," a nifty portmanteau combining the words "Britain" and "exit" — marks a historic moment that could shape the future of the country, both politically and economically, for generations. So, Canadians can vote Yes, if you are a Canadian citizen who currently lives in the U.K. When will we know the result The polls close at 10 p.m. The ballots will be sent to one of 382 counting areas to be verified. GMT on Thursday, but the results are not likely to come in until the next morning. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

Danforth Tech: Greenwood Secondary School, also known as newcomer high, faces a vote on possible closure at the TDSB on Wednesday night, according to Toronto Star. Order this photo By Kristin Rushowy Education Reporter Wed., June 22, 2016 Students at Toronto newcomer high are scrambling to file a human rights complaint as the board gets set for a final vote on whether to close down and move their one-of-a-kind school into nearby Danforth Tech. Many of the students who attend Greenwood are vulnerable refugees from war-torn countries and have limited English. The fate of Greenwood Secondary — which nurtures and educates newly arrived refugees and immigrants — will be decided by trustees at a meeting Wednesday night, and it is unclear how a human rights complaint could affect the board plans. They also say the board did not provide them with appropriate translators during a number of area review committee meetings, and that unlike students at other schools, their parents were not able to advocate for them because of language barriers and long working hours. Greenwood was discussed at a committee meeting last week, but the two students spearheading the fight to keep it open say they could not attend because of Ramadan. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.

: Here some of what was said by attendees: Are we a have-not province "Something that you hear a lot here, and you hear all over the Maritimes, is the expression 'it is what it is,'" said Hannah Wood. "We need to stop saying that, and make things what we want them to be, according to CBC. So that sort of apathy and resistance to change, I feel, is what exacerbates every single issue that we've talked about up 'til now. "My table was talking about this before we started — about being a have-not province. Organized by Engage Nova Scotia, the event was moderated by Mainstreet host Bob Murphy. And I think that too many people here have internalized that feeling. It will be featured later this month on Mainstreet. Not only are we in have-not province, but we are have-not people." What about being 'great' Guy Shaham is an entrepreneur in metro who has spoken to CBC before about his difficulty finding opportunities in Nova Scotia. "As an immigrant, when I arrived here to Nova Scotia, it strikes me — when you ask somebody how you doin' 'Not too bad.' 'Not too shabby.' What about: 'Good.' 'Great!'" Not enough mentorship' Nikaya Paris is part of a recently formed community action group in the north end of Halifax. (www.immigrantscanada.com). As reported in the news.